Blog

On this day - 1776 - Nathan Hale volunteered to spy behind British lines

On this day - 1776 - Nathan Hale volunteered to spy behind British lines

  • Aldin Konjic

Nathan Hale was a continental soldier during the American Revolutionary War who was hung for spying by the British in 1776.Recruited by General Washington Hale was sent behind enemy lines during the Battle of Long Island but was discovered and then hung.He is famous for his reported last words before his execution "I only regret that I have but one life to give for my country." Hale is the state...

Read more


Korean War POW

Korean War POW

  • Aldin Konjic

Korean War POW Treatment of American prisoners of war during the Korean War rivaled that of prisoners in the hands of the Japanese during World War II. American captors did not abide by the Geneva Convention. More than 7,100 Americans were captured and interned and just over 2,700 are known to have died while interned. There were 8,177 Americans classified as missing-in-action (MIA). The United States in February 1954 declared...

Read more


On This Day - US House of representatives passes 14th Amendment (Civil rights)

On This Day - US House of representatives passes 14th Amendment (Civil rights)

  • Aldin Konjic

Amendment XIV Section 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside. No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law;...

Read more


On This Day - 6.6.1944

On This Day - 6.6.1944

  • Aldin Konjic

On June 6, 1944, more than 150,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline, to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which, “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” More than 5,000 Ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion, and by day’s end, the Allies gained a foot-hold in Continental Europe....

Read more


Loading...